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Are Corn Tortillas Low FODMAP? (Uh-Oh)

A low FODMAP diet is a dietary plant especially beneficial for people with IBS. This is because it limits the consumption of indigestible, fermentable carbs that tend to trigger IBS symptoms.

Sometimes, though, it might be hard to figure out which foods are low in FODMAPs and which are high – especially when it comes to high-carb foods.

For example, tortillas of any kind primarily contain carbs, so they probably contain a lot of FODMAPs. But is that true when it comes to all tortillas?

Let’s take a look at corn tortillas – are they high or low in FODMAPs?

Are Corn Tortillas Low FODMAP?

Corn tortillas are a challenging food for people with IBS. This is because fresh corn tends to be high in FODMAPs, so some products containing it are also bad for a low FODMAP diet.

Luckily, corn tortillas are processed and don’t contain too much corn, as a rule. So, they’re much lower in FODMAPs, which means you might be able to include them on a low FODMAP diet without triggering any IBS symptoms.

How low in FODMAPs are corn tortillas?

Are Corn Tortillas Low FODMAP?
Are Corn Tortillas Low FODMAP?

A single corn tortilla (24-26 grams) is a safe serving for people with IBS and on a low FODMAP diet. In this serving, you won’t ingest too many FODMAPs, which means you won’t experience any IBS-related symptoms.

Still, remember to stick to this serving, as anything more than that is much higher in FODMAPs. So, try not to overdo it, particularly if your IBS symptoms are severe.

When determining how high or low in FODMAPs corn tortillas are, it’s important to look at the nutritional label. 

This is crucial, as different brands have different carb contents. Because of that, some tortillas might be much higher in FODMAPs than you think.

It’s also important to avoid adding too many high-FODMAP ingredients inside your corn tortillas. So, make sure to choose low-carb and low-FODMAP alternatives. 

Can you eat corn tortillas on a low FODMAP diet?

Corn tortillas, in moderation, are allowed on a low FODMAP diet. As long as you consume just one tortilla in a single sitting, you should be able to include this food in your diet without worsening your IBS.

Can you eat corn tortillas on a low FODMAP diet?
Can you eat corn tortillas on a low FODMAP diet?

Corn tortillas might also contain a good dose of fiber, which is very good for your digestive system. 

So, eating this food can improve your IBS symptoms in the long run – particularly if you follow an otherwise healthy diet rich in other high-fiber foods.

Are other types of tortillas low in FODMAPs?

Generally, corn tortillas seem to be the best for people on a diet low in FODMAPs. Other kinds of tortillas, such as flour or wheat tortillas, are much higher in FODMAPS, which means that eating them can trigger some unpleasant IBS symptoms. 

It’s also important to keep in mind which ingredients you add to your tortillas. Foods like onions, garlic, snow peas, leeks, and many more are high in FODMAPs. 

So, make sure to avoid these and stuff your tortillas with foods like spinach, tomato, kale, and similar.

When it comes to meat, you can include all kinds, as it’s practically FODMAP-free and rich in protein and other minerals and vitamins.

Are corn tortillas good for you?

One of the best benefits of corn tortillas is that they’re much lower in calories as compared to flour or wheat tortillas. 

They’re also lower in carbs but higher in fiber, which means that eating them can help you stay fuller for longer.

How low in FODMAPs are corn tortillas?
How low in FODMAPs are corn tortillas?

The fiber in corn tortillas also helps feed the ‘good’ gut bacteria in your stomach, preventing indigestion and helping food travel faster through your digestive tract. This can be especially beneficial for people with IBS.

Corn tortillas are also a good source of phosphorus, a mineral that helps build strong teeth and reduce muscle pain after exercise. Phosphorus also helps flush out waste from your kidneys and produce DNA and RNA.

It’s a very important mineral, so it’s a good idea to include a lot of phosphorus-rich foods in your diet.

In addition, corn tortillas are much lower in sodium than flour tortillas. Because of that, eating them won’t raise your blood pressure as much. It also reduces your risk of strokes and heart attacks.

While sodium is an important mineral, it’s important not to get too much of it to avoid any health issues.

Corn tortillas are also a better choice for people with gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. 

If you suffer from any of these conditions, it’s important to avoid flour tortillas and stick to corn tortillas instead, as they’re gluten-free.

So, if you already suffer from IBS and gluten sensitivity, corn tortillas are your best shot.

What’s more, corn tortillas also provide you with a good dose of magnesium, especially considering the calories. 

This mineral helps strengthen your bones, ease the symptoms of depression, and alleviate headaches and migraines.

Getting enough magnesium also reduces your risk of osteoporosis, high blood pressure, and pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS).

So, adding magnesium-rich foods like corn tortillas to your diet is beneficial.

According to some studies, eating corn tortillas is also good for people who are trying to lose weight. 

Are corn tortillas good for you?
Are corn tortillas good for you?

This type of tortilla contains a good amount of fiber as well as other nutrients that boost your metabolism and help you stay fuller for longer.

So, you’re less likely to consume too many unnecessary calories, which can lead to healthy weight loss.

So, as you can see, choosing corn tortillas can be much better for your health than flour tortillas, especially if you suffer from any of the above-mentioned digestive system issues.

Conclusion

Corn tortillas are a safe food to include on a low FODMAP diet, provided that you stick to a small serving of one tortilla. 

In this quantity, corn tortillas are low-FODMAP and safe for people with IBS.

In addition, corn tortillas contain some good nutrients and aren’t too high in calories. So, including them in your diet can bring you some health benefits without adding any unnecessary calories.

Sources: Nutrition Data, PMC, and National Library of Medicine