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Are Bananas Really High In Potassium? (Let’s Find Out)

Bananas are known for their high potassium content. But is that really true? Are bananas the ultimate potassium bomb? Are bananas even high in potassium?

Are bananas high in potassium?

Bananas are high in potassium, as one small banana contains almost 10% of recommended daily potassium intake. That’s much more potassium than in an apple, pineapple, orange, or grapefruit but less than in an avocado, pomegranate, and dates even.

How much potassium is in bananas?

A small banana contains around 360 mg of potassium. That’s around 10% of the daily value, and therefore bananas are considered a high-potassium fruit and food in general. So it seems that bananas have rightfully gained their notoriety for being high in potassium.

Keep on reading to find out how healthy (or not) they are for you and how they stack against avocadoes, potatoes, and apples in terms of potassium content.

Are Bananas High in Potassium? Infographic
Are Bananas High in Potassium? Infographic

Make sure to check out: Can You Check Your Potassium Level At Home? and The Best Low Potassium Snacks (Eat This, Not That).

Nutritional Facts: 1 Small Banana (3.5 oz/101 g)

  • 90 Calories
  • Total Fat 0.3 g 0%
    • Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
  • Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
  • Sodium 1 mg 0%
  • Potassium 361.6 mg 10%
  • Total Carbohydrate 23 g 7%
    • Dietary fiber 2.6 g 10%
    • Sugar 12 g
  • Protein 1.1 g 2%
  • Vitamin C 14%
  • Calcium 0%
  • Iron 1%
  • Vitamin D 0%
  • Vitamin B6 20%
  • Vitamin B12 0%
  • Magnesium 6%

Which has more potassium banana or avocado?

Banana Vs. Avocado
Banana Vs. Avocado

Although bananas are hailed as the fruit with the most potassium, that title should actually go to avocado as it’s the fruit (yes, fruit!) with the most potassium. A 3.5 oz (100 g) of banana contains 358 mg (10%) of potassium, while the same amount of avocado has 485 mg (13%).

Although it doesn’t seem like much of a difference, it is, in fact, noticeable, and people looking to limit or boost their potassium intake should take notice.

100 gBananaAvocado
Calories89160
Carbohydrates23 g9 g
Protein1.1 g2 g
Fat0.3 g15 g
Fiber2.6 g7 g
Potassium358 mg485 mg
Vitamin C (%DV)14%16%
Vitamin B6 (%DV)20%15%
Vitamin B12 (%DV)0%0%
Calcium (%DV)0%1%
Iron (%DV)1%3%
Magnesium (%DV)6%7%
Vitamin D (%DV)0%0%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Which has more potassium banana or apple?

Banana Vs. Apple
Banana Vs. Apple

Banana has three times as much potassium as apples. A 3.5 oz (100 g) serving of banana has 358 mg (10% DV) of potassium while the same serving of apples contains 107 mg (3% DV).

Bananas incredibly have more vitamin C than apples but also more vitamin B6 and magnesium.

100 gBananaApple
Calories8952
Carbohydrates23 g14 g
Protein1.1 g0.3 g
Fat0.3 g0.2 g
Fiber2.6 g2.4 g
Potassium358 mg107 mg
Vitamin C (%DV)14%7%
Vitamin B6 (%DV)20%0%
Vitamin B12 (%DV)0%0%
Calcium (%DV)0%0%
Iron (%DV)1%0%
Magnesium (%DV)6%1%
Vitamin D (%DV)0%0%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Which has more potassium banana or potato?

Banana Vs. Potato
Banana Vs. Potato

Potatoes are incredibly healthy when prepared in the correct way. They also pack more potassium than a banana 421 mg vs. 358 mg per 3.5 oz (100 g) serving. Plus, they’re higher in vitamin C and iron but have fewer calories and fewer carbs.

100 gBananaPotato
Calories8977
Carbohydrates23 g17 g
Protein1.1 g2 g
Fat0.3 g0.1 g
Fiber2.6 g2.2 g
Potassium358 mg421 mg
Vitamin C (%DV)14%32%
Vitamin B6 (%DV)20%15%
Vitamin B12 (%DV)0%0%
Calcium (%DV)0%1%
Iron (%DV)1%4%
Magnesium (%DV)6%5%
Vitamin D (%DV)0%0%
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Can you take in too much potassium from bananas?

Because bananas are high-potassium fruit, it’s actually quite easy to eat too much potassium from bananas. We already know that even a small banana has around 10% of daily potassium value.

That jumps to 12-18% for low-potassium diet followers that tend to take in from 2,000 to 3,000 mg of potassium per day.

Can you eat bananas on a low potassium diet?

Plum and Banana Salad with Lime Dressing and Cashews
Plum and Banana Salad with Lime Dressing and Cashews

Low-potassium dieters should eat only small amounts of bananas per day as they are loaded with potassium and, in conjunction with other foods, could lead to too much potassium intake.

So, how much is recommended? Definitely not more than a couple of small pieces of banana.

Frequently Asked Questions

Are bananas good for diarrhea?

Bananas were once recommended for diarrhea as part of the BRAT food group, and the fact is that the fiber in bananas adds bulk and firmness to the stool. So, yes, bananas can be good for diarrhea.

Are bananas radioactive?

According to the EPA, bananas are, in fact, radioactive due to their high potassium content. However, each banana emits only 0.01 millirem of radiation, which is a tiny amount of radiation.

You’d need to eat 100 bananas to be exposed to as much radiation as you get each day in the US from natural radiation in the environment.

Are bananas high in fiber?

Bananas are high in fiber because even one small banana contains around 10% of recommended daily fiber intake. That’s more fiber than in the same amount of potatoes, apples, pineapples, or oranges but much less than in avocadoes, pears, or even raspberries.

Conclusion

Bananas are indeed high in potassium but also vitamin C and B6. For that reason, they are invaluable to anyone looking to boost their potassium intake.

However, those that are following the low-potassium diet should be careful around bananas exactly because of their high potassium content.

Don’t know which foods are high in potassium? Read our article 15 Best Food Sources Of Potassium. We also have a guide on this important mineral: Potassium 101: All You Need To Know About Potassium.

Source: USDA